Crafted Living

Living a crafted life!

Photography Monday: Oaklawn Portals

Designed by Greene & Greene in 1904-5, these portals were designed to flank the entrance to a private development, Oaklawn.  The gates provided prestige to the subdivision and help establish the ambiance wanted by the developer, S. W. Ferguson.  The entrance gate is composed of two tile roofed towers made of large boulders at the base and progressively smaller cobblestones toward the top that stand on each side of the entranceway.  The tower and the column together support a roof over each pedestrian gate.

A beautiful entrance to this charming neighborhood.

A beautiful entrance to this charming neighborhood.

The towers were meant to support lanterns that would hang over the roadway.

The towers were meant to support lanterns that would hang over the roadway.

The gate design is spectacular and typical of the Craftsman style.

The gate design is spectacular and typical of the Craftsman style.

What an unexpected treat to find at the portal!

What an unexpected treat to find at the portal!

Greene & Greene structures are designed to be a part of the landscape.

Greene & Greene structures are designed to be a part of the landscape.

A very important landmark in South Pasadena.

A very important landmark in South Pasadena.

Preserving our architectural history is important and we must continue the fight.  I am fortunate to live in an area where it is celebrated and access to these architectural gems is easy.  I have been a fan of Greene and Greene architecture for many years so don’t be surprised if they appear again on my blog.

Every great architect is – necessarily – a great poet. He must be a great original interpreter of his time, his day, his age.  -Frank Lloyd Wright

*Tina

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2 thoughts on “Photography Monday: Oaklawn Portals

  1. Joanne Nuckols on said:

    Thanks for featuring the portals which are in my friends front yard. Many don’t know that the gates were stolen years ago, which was quite a shock and loss to the community. Ultimately they were found and returned, thank goodness, to their rightful place.

    Important architectural elements like these portals are irreplaceable and we should cherish them whenever possible.

    Thanks, Tina for your great photos. I think you should post today’s blog on South Pasadena Patch so more of our citizens can enjoy and learn about our architectural heritage.

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